XE Currency Converter - Live Rates

Aussie users

Who here is an Australian user of the app?
What’s your opinion on the app and the cards associated with it?
New user here and just wondering how everyone in Australia rates this service over the rest of the available apps
submitted by spietro1010 to Crypto_com [link] [comments]

ATO Australian tax treatment for options trades 🇦🇺

I am posting this as I hope it will help other Australian options traders trading in US options with their tax treatment for ATO (Australian Tax Office) purposes. The ATO provides very little guidance on tax treatment for options trading and I had to do a lot of digging to get to this point. I welcome any feedback on this post.

The Deloitte Report from 2011

My initial research led me to this comprehensive Deloitte report from 2011 which is hosted on the ASX website. I've been through this document about 20 times and although it's a great report to understand how different scenarios apply, it's still really hard to find out what's changed since 2011.
I am mainly relating myself to the scenario of being an individual and non-sole trader (no business set up) for my trading. I think this will apply to many others here too. According to that document, there isn't much guidance on what happens when you're an options premium seller and close positions before they expire.
Note that the ATO sometimes uses the term "ETO" (Exchange Traded Option) to discuss what we're talking about here with options trading.
Also note: The ATO discusses the separate Capital Gains Tax ("CGT") events that occur in each scenario in some of their documents. A CGT event will then determine what tax treatment gets applied if you don't know much about capital gains in Australia.

ATO Request for Advice

Since the Deloitte report didn't answer my questions, I eventually ended up contacting the ATO with a request for advice and tried to explain my scenario: I'm an Australian resident for tax purposes, I'm trading with tastyworks in $USD, I'm primarily a premium seller and I don't have it set up with any business/company/trust etc. In effect, I have a rough idea that I'm looking at capital gains tax but I wanted to fully understand how it worked.
Initially the ATO respondent didn't understand what I was talking about when I said that I was selling a position first and buying it to close. According to the laws, there is no example of this given anywhere because it is always assumed in ATO examples that you buy a position and sell it. Why? I have no idea.
I sent a follow up request with even more detail to the ATO. I think (hope) they understood what I meant now after explaining what an options premium seller is!

Currency Gains/Losses

First, I have to consider translating my $USD to Australian dollars. How do we treat that?
FX Translation
If the premium from selling the options contract is received in $USD, do I convert it to $AUD on that day it is received?
ATO response:
Subsection 960-50(6), Item 5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA 1997) states the amount should be translated at the time of the transaction or event for the purposes of the Capital Gains Tax provisions. For the purpose of granting an option to an entity, the time of the event is when you grant the option (subsection 104-20(2) ITAA 1997).
This is a very detailed response which even refers to the level of which section in the law it is coming from. I now know that I need to translate my trades from $USD to $AUD according to the RBA's translation rates for every single trade.
But what about gains or losses on translation?
There is one major rule that overrides FX gains and losses after digging deeper. The ATO has a "$250k balance election". This will probably apply to a lot of people trading in balances below $250k a lot of the FX rules don't apply. It states:
However, the $250,000 balance election broadly enables you to disregard certain foreign currency gains and losses on certain foreign currency denominated bank accounts and credit card accounts (called qualifying forex accounts) with balances below a specified limit.
Therefore, I'm all good disregarding FX gains and losses! I just need to ensure I translate my trades on the day they occurred. It's a bit of extra admin to do unfortunately, but it is what it is.

Credit Trades

This is the scenario where we SELL a position first, collect premium, and close the position by making an opposite BUY order. Selling a naked PUT, for example.
What happens when you open the position? ATO Response:
The option is grantedCGT event D2 happens when a taxpayer grants an option. The time of the event is when the option is granted. The capital gain or loss arising is the difference between the capital proceeds and the expenditure incurred to grant the option.
This seems straight forward. We collect premium and record a capital gain.
What happens when you close the position? ATO Response:
Closing out an optionThe establishment of an ETO contract is referred to as opening a position (ASX Explanatory Booklet 'Understanding Options Trading'). A person who writes (sells) a call or put option may close out their position by taking (buying) an identical call or put option in the same series. This is referred to as the close-out of an option or the closing-out of an opening position.
CGT event C2 happens when a taxpayer's ownership of an intangible CGT asset ends. Paragraph 104-25(1)(a) of the ITAA 1997 provides that ownership of an intangible CGT asset ends by cancellation, surrender, or release or similar means.
CGT event C2 therefore happens to a taxpayer when their position under an ETO is closed out where the close-out results in the cancellation, release or discharge of the ETO.
Under subsection 104-25(3) of the ITAA 1997 you make a capital gain from CGT event C2 if the capital proceeds from the ending are more than the assets cost base. You make a capital loss if those capital proceeds are less than the assets reduced cost base.
Both CGT events (being D2 upon granting the option and C2 upon adopting the close out position) must be accounted for if applicable to a situation.
My take on this is that the BUY position that cancels out your SELL position will most often simply realise a capital loss (the entire portion of your BUY position). In effect, it 'cancels out' your original premium sold, but it's not recorded that way, it's recorded as two separate CGT events - your capital gain from CGT event D2 (SELL position), then, your capital loss from CGT event C2 (BUY position) is also recorded. In effect, they net each other out, but you don't record them as a 'netted out' number - you record them separately.
From what I understand, if you were trading as a sole tradecompany then you would record them as a netted out capital gain or loss, because the trades would be classified as trading stock but not in our case here as an individual person trading options. The example I've written below should hopefully make that clearer.
EXAMPLE:
Trade on 1 July 2020: Open position
Trade on 15 July 2020: Close position
We can see from this simple example that even though you made a gain on those trades, you still have to record the transactions separately, as first a gain, then as a loss. Note that it is not just a matter of netting off the value of the net profit collected and converting the profit to $AUD because the exchange rate will be different on the date of the opening trade and on the date of the closing trade we have to record them separately.

What if you don't close the position and the options are exercised? ATO Response:
The option is granted and then the option is exercisedUnder subsection 104-40(5) of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA 1997) the capital gain or loss from the CGT event D2 is disregarded if the option is exercised. Subsection 134-1(1), item 1, of the ITAA 1997 refers to the consequences for the grantor of the exercise of the option.
Where the option binds the grantor to dispose of a CGT asset section 116-65 of the ITAA 1997 applies to the transaction.
Subsection 116-65(2) of the ITAA 1997 provides that the capital proceeds from the grant or disposal of the shares (CGT asset) include any payment received for granting the option. The disposal of the shares is a CGT event A1 which occurs under subsection 104-10(3) of the ITAA 1997 when the contract for disposal is entered into.
You would still make a capital gain at the happening of the CGT event D2 in the year the event occurs (the time the option is granted). That capital gain is disregarded when the option is exercised. Where the option is exercised in the subsequent tax year, the CGT event D2 gain is disregarded at that point. An amendment may be necessary to remove the gain previously included in taxable income for the year in which the CGT event D2 occurred.
This scenario is pretty unlikely - for me personally I never hold positions to expiration, but it is nice to know what happens with the tax treatment if it ultimately does come to that.

Debit Trades

What about the scenario when you want to BUY some options first, then SELL that position and close it later? Buying a CALL, for example. This case is what the ATO originally thought my request was about before I clarified with them. They stated:
When you buy an ETO, you acquire an asset (the ETO) for the amount paid for it (that is, the premium) plus any additional costs such as brokerage fees and the Australian Clearing House (ACH) fee. These costs together form the cost base of the ETO (section 109-5 of the ITAA 1997). On the close out of the position, you make a capital gain or loss equal to the difference between the cost base of the ETO and the amount received on its expiry or termination (subsection 104-25(3) of the ITAA 1997). The capital gain or loss is calculated on each parcel of options.
So it seems it is far easier to record debit trades for tax purposes. It is easier for the tax office to see that you open a position by buying it, and close it by selling it. And in that case you net off the total after selling it. This is very similar to a trading shares and the CGT treatment is in effect very similar (the main difference is that it is not coming under CGT event A1 because there is no asset to dispose of, like in a shares or property trade).

Other ATO Info (FYI)

The ATO also referred me to the following documents. They relate to some 'decisions' that they made from super funds but the same principles apply to individuals they said.
The ATO’s Interpretative Decision in relation to the tax treatment of premiums payable and receivable for exchange traded options can be found on the links below. Please note that the interpretative decisions below are in relation to self-managed superannuation funds but the same principles would apply in your situation [as an individual taxpayer, not as a super fund].
Premiums Receivable: ATO ID 2009/110

Some tips

submitted by cheese-mate-chen-c to options [link] [comments]

Etoro and The bank F*&CKERY - They're both robbing you.

So im looking to invest through Etoro for the long term, Im a math freak and I create various spreadsheets to track my money, anyways to the point, I'm from the UK so the exchange is a real hassle.... not so much when depositing but when I withdraw, ill go into some numbers below.
Lets say I start the year by investing £10000 and I make 50%, great right? yeah, but heres some more numbers.
If I withdraw £15000 from USD to GBP ill have 13.14% of my profits slashed, my banks exchange rate is 1.4107... etorro is 1.2875 from GBP to USD, so £15000 would equate to $19312 USD, as etorro only handles USD and withdraws in USD.
So with $19,312 I withdraw I lose $5 > $19,307. $19,307 Is sent to my bank and my bank converts it to GBP at a rate of 1.4107 which leaves me at £13,686. thats £1314 taken away from me. 13.14% gone. and yes you could say "just dont withdraw then" lets see another example.
Deposit: £30,000 Etoro Conversion: $38,625Profit made: 50%: £45,000 Etoro Conversion: $57,937Withdrawal Free $5 --- $57932
$57932 in withdrawn, $5 fee is taken and is now on its way to the bank.
Natwest handles this withdrawn money at a rate of 1.4107 so our final sum ends at £41,966.49 with a EOY return of 36.89, again we have lost 13.11%. and the banks have taken £3034
So what does this mean? this is bad news to those who are not from the US, alot of people aim for 10% profits per year only to find out that they've made nothing because of the exchange rates, I have ran the numbers multiple time and its crazy when you see the truth, why cant Etoro handle withdrawal conversions? theyre making millions from forex and CFD spreads as it is.
The only solution is if Etoro withdraws your money the same way you deposit it.....
EDIT: this is only the case if you withdraw your funds that aren't your bank account currency, comments below have mentioned that you can choose your withdrawal currency so this shouldn't be a issue, but take this as a lesson, above is a prime example if you choose the wrong option, the banks will penalise your profits big time.
submitted by Zephh26 to Etoro [link] [comments]

What is Forex?

What is Forex?
Forex, also identified as foreign exchange, FX or currency trading, is a decentralized global market where the entire world's currencies trade. The forex market is the biggest, liquid market in the world with an average daily trading volume beyond $5 trillion. Not all the world’s combined stock markets even come close to this. However, what does that mean to you? Take a closer look at forex trading and you may find some exciting trading opportunities unavailable with other investments.
Forex transaction: it is all in the exchange
If you have ever toured overseas, you have made a forex transaction. Take a trip to Belgium and you convert your British pounds into Euros. When you do this, the forex exchange rate between the two currencies—based on supply and demand—determines how many euros you get for your British pounds. Moreover, the exchange rate varies endlessly.
A single British pound on Monday could get you 1.19 euros. On Tuesday, 1.20 euros. This tiny change may not seem like a big deal. However, think of it on a bigger scale. A big international company may need to pay overseas employees, Imagine what that could do to the bottom line if, like in the example above, simply exchanging one currency for another costs you more depending on when you do it? These few pennies add up quickly. In both cases, you—as a tourist, traveler or a business owner—may want to hold your money until the forex exchange rate is more favorable.
Example of Forex Company: Spark Global Limited
What is Spark Global LTD?
Spark Global LTD known as SGL is Global Broker is a foreign exchange community that uses the Meta Trader 5 system to provide investors with copy order trading services. The platform integrates transaction data and connects to multiple exchanges, improves distributed CRM through liquidity and execution speed, provides technical support for transaction models, meets various business needs of customers, and allows investors to obtain DIY finance Digital analysis trading solutions. It has competitive spreads, which helps customers reduce transaction costs. This makes Spark Global Limited a platform that investors can trust. As a global veteran in foreign exchange, Spark Global Limited is very strong and has a relatively high brand value. It is an international veteran foreign exchange dealer and an old brand with more than ten years of history. This makes Spark Global Limited a platform that investors can trust. For more details you can follow their official facebook) or visit their official website or text them on [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected],)
submitted by samysgl to u/samysgl [link] [comments]

Most economical way of paying off student loan from overseas.

I searched through this subreddit and was surprised to see this hasn't been discussed at much length (or I am bad at searching).
I am living overseas in Canada and am being charged 3.5% interest on my student loan balance so I'd like to now start paying it off ASAP.
From what I can see there are a number of possible methods for paying off a student loan from overseas:
I put together a quick table summarizing my options, calculated at 07:00 EDT - 9/8/20. Some things to note:
Method Fee Send Amount (CAD) Recieve Amount (NZD) Notes
TransferWise $8.79 $891.60 $1,000.00
Western Union $0.00 $908.30 $1,000.00
Orbit Remit $0.00 --- --- CAD Not Available
XE $0.00 ? $1,000.00 Website Down
OFX $0.00 $887.67 $1,000.00
Credit Card $0.00 $896.33 $1,000.00
Credit Card $12.72 $909.05 $1,000.00 IRD Convenience fee included (1.42%)​
Direct Debit $0.00 $904.10 $1,000.00
I have a few questions:
Thanks!
submitted by middayjester to PersonalFinanceNZ [link] [comments]

Best way to minimize fees on FX for stake?

Is there an ideal way to avoid the dogshit exchange rates for stake converting to USD? Should I convert via another forex broker of some sort and then deposit USD, costing only $5?
submitted by joeshmow876 to ausstocks [link] [comments]

Currency exchange gains/losses on converting foreign income to CAD

I have had a hard time figuring out whether forex gains/losses on foreign income are taxable when eventually converted to CAD.
Here is the situation:
Is the difference between R2 and R1 taxable? If so, is it income or capital gains?
submitted by EdTsft to cantax [link] [comments]

TransferWise for foreign currency management

Has anyone here used Transferwise (https://transferwise.com/) to deal with foreign currencies? I'm living in the US but frequently get wire transfers in Euros and my bank (BoA) is devouring a huge chunk off the top. My most recent transfer (received payment) was about 10k euros on 8/31 and I lost like $500 of it because it's being converted at like 1.12 when really the euusd rate hasn't been below 1.17 since early august. I called BoA to ask why this discrepancy exists and they said it's due to the rate that the sending bank gives them, which I understand, but that means I have to contact the foreign bank and deal with them which is just annoying and I know they won't change it anyway. I checked on the sending bank's site and it seems they are sending at a rate of about 1.1533 which is closer to the real rate but still about $200 lower than it should be. Looking at Transferwise it seems to imply I can create an account and for a small conversion fee, get much closer to the real forex rate which would mean an extra $300-500/month depending on the size of the payment.
Has anyone used this and if it's not a good solution, how can I keep more of my money? Both sides (receiving and sending) are being shifted significantly from the actual market exchange rate (right now for example the BOA side is converting at 1.1214 for EUR -> USD and costs 1.2449 to go from USD -> EUR...The foreign sign is like 1.15 to go EUR->USD and 1.20 going the other way. Closer, but still not good. The current market rate is actually 1.1856 as we speak).
submitted by sailingsignal to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Extons || Let's get familiar with its tools and features

Extons || Let's get familiar with its tools and features
crypto is well known for its volatility and unpredictable nature. Many projects show good improvement when they first launched but at the end of the campaign, they failed to deliver a promising product to its community. This is a crypto and it gave us a lot of good and useful projects.
Binance doesn't become binance in one day. It takes time to build up a quality exchnage. Though crypto is a very unpredictable sector of finance still there are some qualities that we can judge to know about the project merits. Today I am going to talk about an upcoming exchange that offers so much good tools and service. The name of that exchange is Extons.
For those who are already with me for quite a few days, you all must have known about my previous article about Extons. Today I am going to talk about its service, tools, and potential in the market. Then let's jump into it.

https://preview.redd.it/4lcgkmj17co51.jpg?width=3319&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d5fe887e3de8a277f1559217ae2ad76fe3e9cfd8
Quick introduction:
Before we jump into details about that exchange I want to give you guys a quick introduction about the exchange. Extons is a centralized cryptocurrency exchange that is a part of the thisoption ecosystem. Extons offers multiple payment gateways and a wide variety of crypto trading pairs for its users. They also have some amazing programs for users that can give them an opportunity to make some passive income. Let's talk about different tab of Extons exchange and their use.
Markets: The very first tab a user will see in that exchange when they log in is the market tab. By clicking this tab users will see an interface where they will see various market pair and their annual return based on their investment products. This is a very basic and common tab that every other exchange has.
Trade: In this tab, the user will see the 3 subcategory tab. They are accordingly Basic, Classic, Advanced. Basic one offers the simplest way of trading. The user just needs to select the coin he wants to convert and the coin he wants to receive in return. The conversion rate will be in the current market price and current market price details will be shown right below. In classic trading, users will get old charts and tools but in advanced trade, users will get the most advanced tools and charts for trading.
Finance: In this tab, there are two options available for the user. One is saving and another is staking. Both of them give users a chance to make some passive income by putting their assets into saving program or staking program. The saving program is pretty unique in the Extons platform.
Ecosystem: In this tab, there are 5 components. At first, came white paper. In this project whitepaper, users will be able to know about project details, roadmap, and other project related information.
By clicking the Binary option tab it will redirect users to another website called thisoption where users can take a part in options trading. It is also a product of the Thisoption company.
By clicking the Forex trading tab user will be able to see the Thisoption company's forex trading website. Forex is also a form of trading where cryptocurrency and fiat currency can be traded with each other.

https://preview.redd.it/p43fb2797co51.jpg?width=960&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=eebc0c39fd27e0001d6a55f34ae975df4f48f4f0
The payment gateway tab will take the user to a page where they will be able to use different payment options offered by the Extons platform. There are traditional and crypto payments system.
The communication portal will help traders to keep in touch with other traders in the extons community. They can talk and share with each other will news, trading experience, and opinion.
More: This tab contains News and support. Users can contact support for any help or know about project developments.
Fund: In the fund's tab users will be able to know about their overall portfolio and they can deposit or withdraw their funds from this tab. Also, users will be able to check their deposit and withdraw history from here.
Orders: In the orders, tab users can check their current order status and old order history. They will be able to cancel their current order or modify them as they can.
My savings: In this tab users can see the currently active saving packages they are in. They can join different saving packages based on their portfolio. Also, they can check their income form their savings packages.
I.B Program: In this tab users will be able to check their invitation record and their commission from their referrals. Also, they can find their referral link here that they can share with others to get more referrals commissions.
Profile tab: In this tab, users will get to know about their profile information, security settings, and Address management. They can change their profile information, profile security, and also be able to change their withdrawal address for a different cryptocurrency. Also, they can log out from the platform by clicking log out from this tab.
Wrap up:
Extons doing a massive bounty program for their community. They are super active in social media and keep updating their community about new listing and partnership. I am very impressed with the project and its dedication.

Website || Thisoption || Whitepaper || Telegram || Facebook || Medium

Author: u/thorex25
Disclaimer
This article is not meant to give commercial or any other kind of advice. It is just an informative text at all.
submitted by dojogang to DigitalCryptoWorld [link] [comments]

CGT and foreign shares

I'm confused about how to calculate CGT for foreign shares. Assume that I:
  1. Exchange some AUD into USD.
  2. A few days later, purchase some US shares using the USD.
  3. At some point in the future, sell the shares and receive the USD proceeds.
  4. A few days after that, convert the USD into AUD.
What values do I use for calculating CGT?
I can think of at least two approaches:
The second option seems more logical to me, as it more accurately reflects the exchange rate I got and the actual profit I made. It also seems to be the approach suggested by this ATO page, but maybe I'm misunderstanding it?
Also, is CGT the only thing I need to worry about? Or do other forex taxation rules also come into the picture?
Thanks for any help :)
submitted by Fizwidget to AusFinance [link] [comments]

Error while creating a currency converter (Python)

Hi guys, so I am new and self thought in Python and I was trying to create a currency converter. At first it worked OK but then I tried to make it so it has the option to make another conversion after the first one and I keep getting an error and I don't understand why, can somebody help please? Here is the code:
## Taking inputs ##

def inputs():
first_input = input(" Welcome, please select the currency you want to convert from: \n press 'd' for dollar \n press 'l' for lei \n press 'e' for euro \n")
second_input = input("Following the same pattern as before, please select the currency you want to convert to:")
suma = int(input("Please type the ammount"))
return first_input
return second_input
return suma

## Exchange Rate ##

eurolei = 4.8
dollarlei = 4.4
leieuro = 0.21
leidollar = 0.23
eurodollar = 1.10
dollareuro = 0.91

## Getting the result ##

def result():
result =[]
if first_input == 'e' and second_input == 'l':
result = int(suma) * eurolei
elif first_input == 'd' and second_input == 'l':
result = int(suma) * dollarlei
elif first_input == 'l' and second_input == 'e':
result = int(suma) * leieuro
elif first_input == 'l' and second_input == 'd':
result = int(suma) * leidollar
elif first_input == 'e' and second_input == 'd':
result = int(suma) * eurodollar
elif first_input == 'd' and second_input == 'e':
result = int(suma) * dollareuro
else:
print ("Error")
print (f'result = {result}')

## Make it repeat after the first resutl ##

def program():
playing = True
while playing == True :
inputs()
rezultat()
continuare = input("Go again? 'y' or 'n'")
if continuare.lower()[0] == 'n':
playing == False
else:
playing == True
program()

NameError: name 'first_input' is not defined (line 17: if first_input == 'e' and second_input == 'l':

I could have made it easier, but I wanted to make it this way because later I plan on finding a way to grab the currency exchanges rates live straight from a forex web page and I though that this way would be the best.
I know that this is pretty easy but I'm new to this and any help would be great. Thanks!
submitted by uta44 to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

Trading YYY/ZZZ pair with XXX currency (related to question in FAQ)

I am learning alot about forex but I have not found an explicit answer to this question. I am a bit confused about trading a pair of currencies when I do not own either currency. For example, my account is funded with CAD, so if I trade USD/EUR, am I not risking cancelling out potential gains or multiplying losses based on the fluctuation of CAD/USD at the same time? The answer to this question in the FAQ makes it sounds like it is a non issue:
From the FAQ:
" I AM CONFUSED ABOUT THIS - HOW CAN I GET CURRENCY XXX IF I'M TRADING YYY/ZZZ??
This confuses many new traders. When you create your FX account, you will be nominating what the base currency is, this is usually the currency where you live. Live in the United States? USD. Live in Canada? CAD. Live in Tokyo? JPY. Live in The EU? EUR and so on.... That is the currency that all trades will be paid out in.
The pairs that you trade have no bearing on this outcome. It may help to think of it in this way: "I am going long / going short on the asset known as USD/JPY and will be paid out in my base currency." Don't look at the pair you are trading as multiple exchanges, look at it as a single vehicle, this may help you."
From a risk mitigation stand point, would it be best practice to only trade pairs based on CAD/XXX or would it make more sense to convert my CAD funds to USD for the long term and gamble that the exchange rate remains roughly constant?
If there are any resources you know of that address this question, please let me know!
Thanks!
submitted by Xyphota to Forex [link] [comments]

Summary of offers (total £100+) that require no deposit or spend (great for new members!)

I've noticed among the new members joining, people sometimes ask which offers they should do first, or which ones they could do when they don't have the £/€100 it takes to do many of the offers here. So I hope this little summary of no-spend offers will be helpful to you!
You can make ~£107 with the offers below without spending anything (up to £216 if you do the extra tasks). Notice I included some cryptocurrency offers - don't be afraid of these; they carry pretty much zero risk as you don't need to deposit anything (=buy crypto) - you only need to convert the cryptocurrency bonus back into £/€. If you need help with this, feel free to message me.
I also mention Revolut below, which is a popular online "bank" account. My app is currently not showing any promotions for new users, but perhaps someone else has a referral link for you that will make you some cash!

Swissborg: ~$65
A Swiss fintech focusing on crypto wealth management. You earn CHSB (their token) by collecting badges for doing simple tasks in the app. You can get 600 CHSB (~$65) without much effort, and if you can invite 20 people, you can get up to 1750 CHSB ($190). Please check the current CHSB exchange rate as the token's value may fluctuate.
  1. Download the app.
  2. Register for an account (use my referral code ETTVC6Q and we both get 3,000 points). Tip: the code will get you started with 3,000 points - make your first forecast with 1,000 points and you'll get your first badge :) [don't use a code for no bonus]
  3. Collect badges and earn!
  4. In order to redeem the prizes, you'll need to download their Wealth app and verify ID. The rewards should be redeemable in Q3 2020, once the competition ends (by September).
Detailed post about Swissborg (the token value might have changed since)

Bitwala: €15
A German bank account with integrated crypto services.
  1. Sign up with my link (non-ref-link, no bonus) and verify your identity. (Prepare your passport and a printed proof of address (e.g. bank statement). If no-one picks up for more than a few mins, hang up & try again)
  2. Create a bitcoin wallet in your account.
  3. €15 will be credited to your account within 15 business days. You can withdraw it right after you receive it.
Detailed post about Bitwala

Morpher: ~$15
An upcoming Austrian platform for trading stocks, crypto, and forex.
  1. Sign up via my referral link (non-ref link - no bonus)
  2. Verify your identity.
  3. Get 500 Morpher tokens (estimated value $15) when you get invited to the app and withdrawals are enabled (this should be soon)
Detailed post about Morpher

Quidco: £10
A popular UK cashback site.
  1. Sign up with my referral link (non-ref link - no bonus)
  2. Your bonus will be credited once you reach £5 in confirmed cashback - browse the Free Cashback section for no-spend offers!

Topcashback: £5
Another UK cashback site.
  1. Sign up with my referral link (non-ref link - no bonus)
  2. Your bonus will be credited once you reach £10 in confirmed cashback. Again, you could browse the no-spend offers, or buy something from a store where you'd shop anyways!

Curve: £5
A debit card to which you add your existing cards, and then you only have to carry the Curve card and choose which underlying card to pay with in the app.
  1. Download the app using this link (use code D8XMLG5E when signing up. No code, no bonus.)
  2. Order a free card (=Curve Blue).
  3. When it arrives, link a card you already own to your new Curve card.
  4. Make a first transaction with the Curve card (this can either be a regular in-store/online purchase, but people have successfully gotten the bonus just by linking the Curve card to their Paypal account or by connecting it to Google Pay/Apple Pay - so you don't have to spend anything. There's also no minimum spend requirement.) Note: you must make your first transaction within 7 days from signing up!
  5. £5 will be added to your Curve Cash card. You can spend it immediately. You can also send it to your Revolut - set up a payment link in Revolut, and pay it using the Curve card, with Curve Cash set as the underlying card.
Detailed post about Curve

Bitpanda: €5+
A reputable Austrian cryptocurrency exchange.
  1. Sign up using my link (non-ref link - no bonus)
  2. Verify your identity.
  3. Complete the beginner quiz and receive €5 in BEST (the Bitpanda token).
  4. Bonus: you can get an extra €10 if you're willing to deposit €25 and complete your first crypto trade of at least €25. The bonus will be credited instantly. Tip: buy BEST for €25, and then sell all BEST including the €5 bonus.
Note: you can withdraw the bonuses right after you receive them, but the minimum withdrawal and deposit amount is €/£25, so you can either deposit €/£25, get the extra €10, and withdraw everything back, or - if you don't want to deposit anything - you can transfer the BEST bonus to another crypto exchange or wallet. Up to you :)
Detailed post about Bitpanda

Zelf: €5
An upcoming service where you can do banking in your favorite messenger app (Messenger, Whatsapp, etc).
  1. Sign up using my link and finish the registration in your favorite messaging platform. (non-ref-link, no bonus)
  2. Get €5 when they launch. Everybody in France and Spain should get their cards by the end of June and the rest of Europe by September.
Detailed post about Zelf
Let me know if you need help with any of these!
submitted by One_Refrigerator to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

Forex vs Credit card?

Hi,
does anyone know any benefits of forex card (such as HDFC bank MakeMyTrip Forex card ) over a credit card (say a credit card which offers 2% markup instead of 3.5%) ?


HDFC bank MMT forex card with zero issuance fee: : https://www.hdfcbank.com/personal/products/cards/forex-cards/makemytrip-forexplus-card

HDFC Diners black offers 2% markup

  1. So if make transactions worth 10,000 INR on diners black, it will charge me 10,200 INR. correct? (diners black may not be accepted everywhere though)
  2. What would be the equivalent charges on 10,000 INR money load for forex card? Where can I check this?
submitted by rents17 to IndiaInvestments [link] [comments]

Hidden currency conversion costs

A couple of weeks ago, I posted a question about currency conversion costs. Between the fact that no one seemed able to answer it, and my surprise at what I learned, I thought I'd post my findings here.
I got one Forex broker on the phone. Other sites seem to quote the same rate, so for the moment, I'm assuming they all work roughly the same way.
The Red Herring
My original question concerned the possibility of double spread costs when trading pairs that don't include our account currency. Fortunately, this turns out not to be a thing.
However...
They do apply a whopping 0.0050 (50 pip!) currency conversion fee to the majority of trades, including those involving our account currency.
To understand how it works, I had to remind myself that in retail Forex we're not actually trading any currencies. We're trading "contracts for the difference" in given exchange rates, between the open and close of our positions.
The Good News
The good news is that since we never actually hold the currencies represented by our positions the currency conversion fee doesn't apply to them. It only applies to any profit/loss that closing our positions realizes in another currency.
So while the currency conversion fee diminishes a win or increases a loss, it can't turn a win into a loss.
The Bad News
The bad news is that the currency conversion fee applies any time the counter currency isn't our account currency, including when the base currency is our account currency, and including when we short that pair.
For example, our account is in USD, and we short USD/CAD.
This is often spoken of as buying CAD with our USD, then later buying USD with the CAD we were holding, in which case our profit/loss would be in USD — our account currency — with no further conversion to be done. But that's not what's really happening.
Shorting this pair is "selling" a number of "contracts for the difference" in the opening and closing USD/CAD rate, with that rate quoted, and therefore the profit/loss realized, in CAD, which then gets converted to our account currency, at a cost.
And with the majority of pairs having a counter currency different from our account currency, that means we're paying this fee on most position we take.
submitted by BluffCall to Forex [link] [comments]

Sri Lankan Rupees

Where can I get Sri Lankan rupees in the city?
submitted by MurtazaKothari to bangalore [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay
Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to u/bhaskarndas [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay

Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to StockMarketIndia [link] [comments]

What would happen if sovereign governments gave bitcoin a gold peg?

This is a totally theoretical post, but I believe it is a really interesting idea and would love to get the Internet's feedback on it, and what you think the ripple effects would be in the scenario described. Am very interested in writing this up and republishing it widely so it can be read by monetary policymakers in all major developed countries - if you know anyone like that, pass it on. In a move that would act like a bridge to a pre-Bretton Woods type of gold peg, (here is a great paper on a history of this in the US: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41887.pdf) sovereign governments with gold holdings could (again, it is a theoretical idea - I am saying they COULD do this NOT that anyone or any country is doing this that I know of) establish open market operations to purchase bitcoins (partly as a diversification strategy) using their physical gold holdings at a fixed peg rate of 5 ounces per bitcoin. The reason I say 5 is because the current chart here seems to suggest that somewhat of a convergence to 5 oz is already occurring: https://www.xe.com/currencycharts/?from=XBT&to=XAU&view=10Y
If any government did this and offered to buy physically delivered bitcoins from private holders of bitcoin (no other coins just BTC) in exchange for private delivery of physical gold, then the standard governmental unit of physical gold (held in places like Fort Knox) - known as the Good Delivery Bar which is 400oz of gold - could be procured by any holder of 80 or more coins in a secure and sanctioned exchange with the government in question - the most impactful of course would be if the US did this.
My theory is that any time the exchange rate mechanisms in the forex or crypto markets violated the peg, there would be arbitrage opportunities that would bring the peg back in line. It would not only stabilize BTC, but the stabilization might spread via the 24/7 exchange rate mechanism in the crypto market to stabilize many cryptos that are still somewhat worthy experimental stores of value. Depending on the strength, credit, and depth of gold holdings of whatever governments engaged in this, it would seem that such a strategy could transform bitcoin into a new type of sound money, and also signal that owning bitcoin and gold is a priority of governments as well as their citizens. The gold standard was powerful both because it was tethered to something of limited quantity in the earth's crust with unique properties, but also because pre-Bretton Woods gold standards acted very much like a peg - and the government honored the peg no matter what. So in some sense it was still the "faith and credit of the government" that made that peg work so famously. I was partly inspired by this recent award-winning documentary www.inmoneywetrust.org in formulating this idea, and partly by my own academic interest in cryptocurrency. I believe bitcoin, above all others, because of its deflationary nature and algorithmically fixed quantity, is powerful all in itself - but with a peg from a real government to a real precious metal that many governments do in fact hoard (for whatever reason) - it could become both an international currency, and a form of truly sound money backed by governments' physical gold reserves and a legal or policy commitment to a peg of 5 ounces to 1 bitcoin.
What do you all think would happen if a major government or many major governments did this? Remember the idea is to convince monetary policymakers in governments to willingly and openly bypass completely the fiat currencies of their governments and to make no informational commitment to those free-floating fiat markets for forex - so the bitcoins transacted for in the peg wouldn't be bought with dollars or yen or anything that could be printed by fiat. This would simply be a convertibility guarantee by major governments that 1 bitcoin, transferred to the Treasury by a private citizen or business (again so the Treasury could diversify holdings of sound money), would be convertible and be guaranteed to be convertible to 5 oz of physical, deliverable gold bullion (or 80 bitcoins per bar). Here is a list of the largest physical gold holders on earth who could theoretically engage in this type of operation: https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/040715/what-countries-have-largest-gold-reserves.asp
Thanks Reddit! Looking forward to your thoughts!
Alex Kaufman
submitted by emersonian85 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

PSA: I forked a Tampermonkey script to extract your order/product data from AliExpress into a csv list.

Aloha!
Export aliexpress orders to clipboard as csv is a Tampermonkey skript that will:
Like all those scripts this one is still depending on scraping the web page. You have to advance through the order pages manually, grabbing every page and pasting it to editoExcel/Sheets....
It grabs the historic exchange rates from api.exchangeratesapi.io. If you're not a EURo guy/gal, you can just ignore the columns, as the script keeps the original amounts, e.g. in USD.
This is basically a fork of two existing scripts that didn't fulfill my needs (credited in the Readme). I even retained their names.

Hope this can be helpful to you. Let me know what you think and have fun using it!
submitted by ohuf to Aliexpress [link] [comments]

Thoughts on dividend investing for non-US residents?

A non-US resident would have to pay more than the cost of the share, such as 1. foreign exchange fee (varies, but can go from .5 to 2%); 2. brokerage fees (some are free, but most would charge either a percentage or fixed rate) and 3) expense ratio (if buying ETFs). Any dividends received would either be reinvested (another fee if no automatic DRIP) or converted back to local currency (again at a hefty forex rate). With this in mind, does it still make sense to have majority of the one's portfolio in the US stock market? Or is it more cost-efficient to focus on one's local stock market? Even the local stock brokerage firms charge a fixed amount ($30) per trade. Would love to hear from other dividend investors on their take on this. Thanks :)

TL;DR: With the fees involved in investing in the US, is it still cost-efficient to have the majority of the portfolio in them?
submitted by ParadiseAppleFields to dividends [link] [comments]

If you are Canadian, cgc vs weed

Cgc seems like their volume is greater chart guy says he will go with the stock with more volume.
What do you think?
submitted by redsoxo4 to weedstocks [link] [comments]

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